NA Digest Sunday, January 2, 2005 Volume 05 : Issue 01

Today's Editor:
Cleve Moler
The MathWorks, Inc.
moler@mathworks.com

Submissions for NA Digest:

Mail to na.digest@na-net.ornl.gov.

Information via e-mail about NA-NET: Mail to na.help@na-net.ornl.gov.

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From: Gene Golub <golub@sccm.stanford.edu/notls>
Date: Mon, 27 Dec 2004 23:02:37 -0800 (Pacific Standard Time)
Subject: David Wheeler

The Times (London), December 24, 2004.

"A pioneer of the Edsac computer at Cambridge who helped to develop
programming language"

DAVID WHEELER was one of the generation of mathematicians and engineers who
were drawn to the newly emerging discipline of computer science in the period
immediately after the Second World War. As a member of the team working with
Maurice Wilkes on Cambridge's Edsac (Electronic Delay Storage Automatic
Computer), he was responsible for the system that provided instructions to the
computer, and the innovations he made at the time still form the basis of
modern computer programming.

Wheeler's "initial orders" allowed Edsac instructions to be provided in a
simple language rather than by writing binary numbers, and made it possible for
non-specialists to begin to write programs. This was the first "assembly
language" and was the direct precursor of every modern programming language,
all of which derive from the desire to let programmers write instructions in a
legible form that can then be translated into computer-readable binary.

As the first programmer for Edsac, Wheeler invented ways of working which have
now become standard. He realised that lines of program code could often be
reused, and created the subroutine and the idea of keeping frequently-needed
subroutines in a separate library which could be called on as necessary. He
also developed the "Wheeler Jump" to allow a program to pass control to a
subroutine, the precursor of the "goto" statement known to everyone who has
ever written a program in Basic.

Wheeler was an inspiring teacher who helped to develop computer science
teaching at Cambridge from its inception in 1953, when the Diploma in Computer
Science was launched as the world's first taught course in computing. Many of
his research students now occupy senior positions in major computer companies,
or have made their own significant contributions to computer science, including
the development of new programming languages.

David John Wheeler was born in 1927 in Birmingham. He was one of many children
evacuated from major cities during the period of heavy bombing in the Second
World War. In 1945 he was awarded a scholarship to Trinity College, Cambridge,
where he read mathematics and graduated in 1948. During this period Maurice
Wilkes was working in the reopened Mathematical Laboratory, as the Computer
Laboratory was known until 1970, on a project to build a stored-program
electronic computer called Edsac. In 1947 Wheeler joined a group of students
working with Wilkes, and after graduation he became the lab's second
post-graduate student.

The first program was run on Edsac in March 1949, incorporating many of
Wheeler's innovations in its program system. These included the "initial
orders", a program which could translate simple commands into the binary
instructions needed by the computer. This allowed Edsac to be programmed by
non-specialists and marked the first step in the development of programming
languages. Edsac was not the first computer to store and run a program, because
Manchester University's "Baby" had been doing so since June 1948, but Wheeler's
work meant that Edsac could be made available to researchers outside the
Mathematical Laboratory.

Experience with writing programs for Edsac led Wheeler and his colleagues
Maurice Wilkes and Stanley Gill to publish the first book for programmers, The
Preparation of Programs for an Electronic Digital Computer, in 1951, and
Wheeler received the first doctorate awarded by the lab in the same year.
However, by the time he heard that he had been awarded a two-year research
fellowship at Trinity College he had accepted a post as assistant professor at
the University of Illinois, home of the Ordvac (Ordnance Discrete Variable
Automatic Computer), the world's fastest computer at the time. Wheeler worked
on the programming system for Ordvac and its successor, the Illiac.

He returned to Cambridge in 1953, taking up his deferred fellowship and
returning to the Mathematical Laboratory. Although most of the design work on
Edsac 2, the successor to the original Edsac, had been completed, he quickly
took on a key role defining its programming system and the basic set of
commands that the computer could carry out -- what is now called an "instruction
set". Edsac 2 went into service in 1958.

In 1955 Joyce Blackler, a research student in applied mathematics, began using
Edsac for her work and met David Wheeler. They married in August 1957.

Wheeler spent the rest of his career in Cambridge, although he returned to
Illinois in 1959 for a brief period, during which his son Martin was born. In
Cambridge he worked on the Titan computer, which replaced Edsac 2 in 1964, and
he made significant contributions to work in computer networks, data
compression techniques and computer security. His daughters Lois and Alison
were born in Cambridge.

He became a Fellow of Darwin College in 1965 and spent 1966 at the University
of California in Berkeley, working on ways to connect online terminals to
mainframe computers. In 1968 he worked for a period at Bell Labs, the foremost
commercial computing research institution of the time, on data compression
techniques. He became Professor of Computer Science in 1977.

He retired in 1994 but remained an active member of the Computer Laboratory
until his death, despite increasing loss of vision caused by age-related
macular degeneration.

David Wheeler was a private man who was not well known outside the academic
computer science community, but his significant contribution to modern
computing was widely acknowledged within the field. He was elected a fellow of
the British Computer Society in 1970, and in 1981 he became one of the earliest
computer scientists to be elected a Fellow of the Royal Society. In 1985 the
Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers awarded him the Pioneer Medal
"for assembly language programming", and last year he was made a fellow of the
Computer History Museum.

He is survived by his wife, Joyce, and by their three children.

David John Wheeler, computer scientist, was born on February 9, 1927. He died
on December 13, 2004, aged 77.


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From: Petr Prikryl <prikryl@math.cas.cz>
Date: Tue, 28 Dec 2004 12:29:17 +0100
Subject: Czech Institute Best Paper

The paper P. Solin, K. Segeth: Non-uniqueness of almost
unidirectional inviscid compressible flow, Appl. Math. 49 (2004), 247
- 268 was awarded by the publishers, Mathematical Institute of the
Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic in Prague, as the best
scientific paper published by a member of the Institute in Appl. Math.
in 2004. The second author, Karel Segeth (segeth@math.cas.cz), is the
member of the Institute, while the first author, Pavel Solin
(solin@utep.edu), is now at the University of Texas at El Paso.

The authors seek the origins of the non-unique behavior of gases
which can be observed in certain axisymmetric nozzle geometries under
special flow regimes. For this purpose they use several versions of
the compressible Euler equations. It turns out that the main reason
for the non-uniqueness is hidden in the energy decomposition into its
internal and kinetic parts, and their complementary behavior. They
show that a bifurcation can occur only at flow regimes with the Mach
number equal to one (sonic states). Analytical quasi-one-dimensional
results are supplemented by quasi-one-dimensional and axisymmetric
three-dimensional finite volume computations. Good agreement between
quasi-one-dimensional and axisymmetric results, including the
presence of multiple stationary solutions, is presented for
axisymmetric nozzles.

Antonin Sochor, Director of the Mathematical Institute


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From: Joanna Littleton <littleton@siam.org>
Date: Wed, 29 Dec 2004 12:17:13 -0500
Subject: Nominations for SIAM Germund Dahlquist Prize

DEADLINE APPROACHING - CALL FOR NOMINATIONS

The Germund Dahlquist Prize

SIAM will present the Dahlquist Prize at the 2005 International Conference
on Scientific Computation and Differential Equations (SciCADE05), to be
held May 23-27, 2005, at the Nagoya Congress Center in Nagoya, Japan.

The prize, established in 1995, is awarded to a young scientist (normally
under 45) for original contributions to fields associated with Germund
Dahlquist, especially the numerical solution of differential equations and
numerical methods for scientific computing.

Description of the Award

The award will consist of a certificate containing the citation and a cash
prize of $1,000. The recipient will be expected to present a talk at the
conference. SIAM will reimburse the prize recipient's reasonable travel
expenses to receive the award and deliver the talk.

Nominations

A letter of nomination, including a description of contributions, should be
sent by January 15, 2005, to:

Dahlquist Prize Selection Committee
Dr. Christian Lubich, Chair
c/o J. M. Littleton
SIAM
3600 University City Science Center
Philadelphia, PA 19104-2688

phone: +1-215-382-9800
fax: +1-215-386-7999

Selection Committee

Members of the selection committee are: Christian Lubich (chair),
University of Tuebingen, Germany; Stephen L. Campbell, North Carolina State
University; Wayne Enright, University of Toronto; Sebastian Reich, Imperial
College London; and Gustaf Soderlind, Lund University, Sweden.


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From: Joanna Littleton <littleton@siam.org>
Date: Wed, 29 Dec 2004 12:18:12 -0500
Subject: Nominaitons for SIAM Optimization Prize

DEADLINE APPROACHING - CALL FOR NOMINATIONS

SIAM Activity Group on Optimization Prize

The SIAM Activity Group on Optimization Prize (SIAG/OPT Prize) will be
awarded at the SIAM Conference on Optimization to be held May 15-18, 2005,
in Stockholm, Sweden.

The SIAG/OPT Prize, established in 1992, is awarded to the author(s) of the
most outstanding paper, as determined by the prize committee, on a topic in
optimization published in English in a peer-reviewed journal. The award
period is the four calendar years preceding the year of the conference.

Eligibility

Candidate papers must be published in English in a peer-reviewed journal
bearing a publication date within the award period. Thus, to be eligible
for the prize, a paper must appear with a publication date in the 2001-2004
calendar years. Candidate papers must contain significant research
contributions to the field of optimization, as commonly defined in the
mathematical literature, with direct or potential applications.

Description of the award

The award will consist of a plaque and a certificate containing the
citation. At least one of the prize recipients is expected to attend the
award ceremony and to present the paper at the conference.

Nominations

A letter of nomination, including a citation of the paper, should be sent
by January 15, 2005, to:

SIAM Activity Group on Optimization Prize
Professor Robert Vanderbei, Chair
c/o J. M. Littleton
SIAM
3600 University City Science Center
Philadelphia, PA 19104-2688

E-mail: littleton@siam.org
Telephone: 215-382-9800
Fax: 215-386-7999

Selection Committee

The members of the selection committee are: Robert Vanderbei (chair),
Princeton University; Aharon Ben-Tal, Technion; Adrian Lewis, Simon Fraser
University; S. Thomas McCormick, University of British Columbia; and Yinyu
Ye, Stanford University.


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From: Joanna Littleton <littleton@siam.org>
Date: Wed, 29 Dec 2004 12:19:04 -0500
Subject: Nominations for SIAM Control and Systems Theory Prize

DEADLINE APPROACHING - CALL FOR NOMINATIONS

SIAM Activity Group on Control and Systems Theory Prize

The SIAM Activity Group on Control and Systems Theory Prize (SIAG/CST
Prize) will be awarded at the Sixth SIAM Conference on Control and Its
Applications, to be held July 11-14, 2005, jointly with the 2005 SIAM
Annual Meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana.

The SIAG/CST Prize, established in 1997, is awarded every three years to a
young researcher for outstanding research contributions, as determined by
the prize committee, to mathematical control or systems theory. The
contributions must be contained in a paper or papers published in English
in peer-reviewed journals.

Eligibility

The awardee's work must be a significant research contribution to the
mathematical theory of systems and control, as commonly defined in the
mathematical and engineering literature. At least one of the papers
containing this work must be published in English in a peer-reviewed
journal, bearing a publication date within the award period, and such that
at least one of the following two requirements is met at the publication
date: either (1) the author is not more than 35 years old, or (2) not more
than six years have elapsed since the author received a Ph.D. or equivalent
degree.

Description of the award

The award will consist of a plaque and a certificate containing the
citation. An invitation will be extended to the prize recipient to attend
the award ceremony to receive the award and to present the paper.

Nominations

A letter of nomination, including citation of paper(s), should be sent by
January 15, 2005, to:

SIAM Activity Group on Control and Systems Theory Prize
Professor Steven I. Marcus, Chair
c/o J. M. Littleton
SIAM
3600 University City Science Center
Philadelphia, PA 19104-2688

E-mail: littleton@siam.org
Telephone: 215-382-9800 ext. 303
Fax: 215-386-7999

Selection Committee

Members of the selection committee are: Steven I. Marcus (Chair),
University of Maryland; H. T. Banks, North Carolina State University; Max
Gunzburger, Florida State University; Belinda King, Oregon State
University; Kirsten A. Morris, University of Waterloo.


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From: Joanna Littleton <littleton@siam.org>
Date: Wed, 29 Dec 2004 12:19:38 -0500
Subject: Nominations for SIAM W. T. and Idalia Reid Prize

DEADLINE APPROACHING - CALL FOR NOMINATIONS

W. T. and Idalia Reid Prize

SIAM will present the W. T. and Idalia Reid Prize at the 2005 SIAM Annual
Meeting to be held July 11-15, 2005, in New Orleans, Louisiana.

The award will be given for research in, or other contributions to, the
broadly defined areas of differential equations and control theory. The
prize may be given either for a single notable achievement or for a
collection of such achievements. Committee Chair John Burns wishes to
stress the breadth of the eligible fields.

Description of the Award

The award consists of an engraved medal and a $10,000 cash prize. The
prize winner is requested to present a lecture at the meeting.

Nominations

A letter of nomination, including a description of achievement(s), should
be sent to the address below. Nominations must be received in the SIAM
office by January 15, 2005.

W. T. and Idalia Reid Prize
Professor John A. Burns, Chair
c/o J. M. Littleton
SIAM
3600 University City Science Center
Philadelphia, PA 19104-2688

E-mail: littleton@siam.org
Telephone: 215-382-9800
Fax: 215-386-7999


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From: Michelle Montgomery <montgomery@siam.org>
Date: Wed, 29 Dec 2004 16:49:44 -0500
Subject: Locus, Electronic Access to SIAM Journals

SIAM is proud to announce Locus, available January 1, 2005.

Locus contains the electronic full text for every SIAM journal article
published from the journal's inception through 1996. That's approximately
14,000 articles, about 285,000 pages, and more than 250,000 reference
links. Pairing Locus with a subscription to SIAM Journals Online provides
immediate, uninterrupted access to all SIAM journal content from the first
SIAM article published in 1952 to today's publications, with current
articles going online as soon as they are available. Locus articles are
available as fully searchable PDFs; full metadata is available for each
article. Articles published between 1980 and 1996 contain reference links
to Mathematical Reviews, Zentralblatt fŁr Mathematik, and to the cited
article via CrossRef (when available). Reference links back through the
1952 content will be added to Locus by 2007. For more information on how
institutions can order, look at locus.siam.org. Individual SIAM members can
subscribe to Locus for $75; contact SIAM Customer Service at service@siam.org.


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From: Adelia Sequeira <adelia.sequeira@math.ist.utl.pt>
Date: Wed, 29 Dec 2004 01:18:51 +0000
Subject: Conference in Portugal on Modelling of Physiological Flows

ANNOUNCEMENT AND CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS

2nd International Symposium on
MODELLING of PHYSIOLOGICAL FLOWS - MPF 2005
March 31 - April 2, 2005
Hotel do Mar, Sesimbra, PORTUGAL
URL: http://www.math.ist.utl.pt/~mpf2005/

MPF 2005 is the 2nd Symposium of the HaeMOdel
<http://mox.polimi.it/haemodel/> EU projet. The 1st International
Symposium on Modelling of Physiological Flows
<http://iacs.epfl.ch/cmcs/MPF2003/> took place in September 1-3, 2003 at
Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland). MPF 2005 is
co-sponsored by CEMAT/IST and Fundacao para a Ciencia e Tecnologia (FCT).

The aim of the 2nd International Symposium on Modelling of Physiological
Flows is twofold: to gather researchers in various branches of Applied
Mathematics and Computational Fluid Dynamics with special focus on
bio-flows; to present recent advances and promote scientific discussions
on this challenging multidisciplinary field.

*Invited Talks* will be given by the following experts:

D. Chapelle (INRIA, Rocquencourt, France).
A. Corno (Alder Hey Royal Children Hospital, Liverpool, England, UK).
P. Deuflhard (Inst. fŁr Mathematik II, Freie Universitat Berlin, Germany).
R. D. Kamm (Biological Engineering Division, MIT, USA).
B. Maury (Lab. J.L.Lions, Univ.Paris VI, Paris, France).

*Keynote Lectures* by HaeMOdel members and collaborators include:

D. Doorly (Imperial College, London, UK).
L. Formaggia (MOX, Politecnico di Milano, Italy).
J.-F. Gerbeau (INRIA, Rocquencourt, France).
K. Perktold (TUG, Graz, Austria).
C. Prud'homme (EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland).
A. M. Robertson (Univ. of Pittsburgh, School Eng., Pittsburgh, USA).
A. Sequeira (IST, Lisbon, Portugal).

For more information please check out the Symposium web page at
http://www.math.ist.utl.pt/~mpf2005/

or contact one of the *Local Organizers*

Teresa Abreu (secretary): Dep. of Math. and CEMAT/IST, Lisbon, Portugal,
Joao Janela: Dep. of Mathematics-ISEG and CEMAT/IST, Lisbon, Portugal,
Adelia Sequeira (chairman): Dep. of Math. and CEMAT/IST, Lisbon, Portugal,
through the email: mpf2005@math.ist.utl.pt


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From: Jan Hesthaven <Jan.Hesthaven@Brown.edu>
Date: Thu, 30 Dec 2004 16:22:16 -0500
Subject: Conference at Brown on Waves

2nd Announcement and Call for Papers

7th International Conference on Mathematical
and Numerical Aspects of Waves (WAVES'05)

www.dam.brown.edu/waves2005
waves05@dam.brown.edu

June 20-24, 2005
Brown University, RI, USA

The 7th International Conference on Mathematical and Numerical
Aspects of Waves (WAVES'05) will take place at Brown University,
Providence, RI during June 20-24, 2005.

Conference themes include but are not limited to forward and
inverse scattering, fast computational techniques, numerical
analysis, absorbing layers and approximate boundary conditions,
analytic and semi-analytic techniques for wave problems, domain
decomposition, guided waves, random media etc

Invited plenary presentations will be given by

C. Bailly (Ecole Central, Lyon, France)
C. Bardos (U. Paris 7, France)
O. Bruno (CalTech, USA)
F. Cakoni (U. Delaware, USA)
A. Figotin (UC Irvine, USA)
G. Iooss (Institut Nonlineaire, Nice, France)
I. Perugia (U. Pavia, Italy)
G. Uhlmann (U. Washington, USA)


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From: Go05 <go05@dali.ace.ual.es>
Date: Tue, 28 Dec 2004 10:06:18 +0100 (CET)
Subject: Workshop in Spain on Global Optimization

Dear colleagues,

Happy new year on behalf of the organising committee of the

INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP ON GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION GO05, Almería, Spain

Before you start making new plans for 2005, let us remind you of the workshop.
We have been arranging facilities in the pitoresque village of San José,
which makes it possible to keep the fee low and being in a beautiful and
calm environment.

Timing: 18 th -22 th September 2005
Participants arrive on Saturday 17 and leave Thursday 22, afternoon.

Global schedule:
Deadline for the submission of abstracts May 15th, 2005
Notification of acceptance June 15th , 2005
Deadline for early registration (reduced fee) June 30th, 2005
Deadline for last minute registration (450) July ¬ 28th, 2005
On-site reception September 17th, 2005
Start of conference September 18th, 2005

Publication:
Two special issues of the Journal of Global Optimization will publish
papers emerging from the talks after the regular refereeing procedure.

Organising committee:
Emilio Carrizosa, Sevilla
Tibor Csendes, Szeged
Inmaculada García, Almería
Eligius Hendrix, Wageningen
Panos Pardalos, Florida

Local organisers:
Miguel Cobo
Leocadio Casado
Pilar Ortigosa
Boglárka Tóth
Consolación Gil
Ra√ļl Banos
Juana Redondo

Keep updated via http://dali.ace.ual.es/~go05/


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From: Husnu Erbay <erbay@isikun.edu.tr>
Date: Tue, 28 Dec 2004 16:21:42 +0200
Subject: Faculty Positions at Isik University, Turkey

ISIK UNIVERSITY
Department of Mathematics

The Department of Mathematics at Isik University invites applications
for faculty positions at the Assistant Professor level from all areas of
mathematics. The appointment begins September 1, 2005. In addition,
multi-year visiting assistant professor positions will be available.
Applicants should have a Ph.D. in mathematics and should show
outstanding promise and/or accomplishments in both research and
teaching. Duties include undergraduate and graduate teaching and
independent research.

The University is located in Sile, forty miles east of Istanbul, at the
coastline of Black Sea. Applicants should send a letter of application,
a curriculum vitae and the names of three references to:

Saadet Erbay
Chair, Department of Mathematics
Isik University
34398 Maslak, Istanbul
Turkey

Electronic submissions may be forwarded to serbay@isikun.edu.tr


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From: Glenn Terje Lines <glennli@simula.no>
Date: Thu, 30 Dec 2004 14:52:29 +0100
Subject: Postdoctoral Position at Simula Research Laboratory, Oslo

Open Position in Computational Biology
Simula Research Laboratory, Oslo, Norway

Simula Research Laboratory has an ongoing project called
Cardiac Computations which is concerned with developing
and utilizing efficient simulators for a number of cardiac
phenomena, including electrophysiology and mechanics.

We have an open position at the postdoc level in this group.
The qualifications should include:

* Ph.D. degree in scientific computing or similar

* Knowledge and understanding of relevant mathematical models,
i.e. the bidomain model or cell electrophysiology models.


Please send your CV and publication list by email to
Glenn Terje Lines (glennli@simula.no) before February 1.


Simula Research Laboratory was established in 2001, and conducts
basic research in selected areas within information and communication
technology. The Cardiac Computations group is part of the
Department of Scientific Computing, which is an internationally
recognized research unit within its target fields.
The laboratory is located in modern office facilities at Lysaker,
just outside the city of Oslo, Norway.


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End of NA Digest

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